On behalf of Fair Fight Action, TargetSmart conducted a public opinion research study on American attitudes surrounding democracy, elections, and associated proposed legislation. The survey included 603 registered voters in Georgia, weighted to be representative of the population of registered voters in the state. 

The poll finds that Georgia voters broadly and strongly oppose measures restricting voting rights that have moved through the Georgia General Assembly.

Our poll finds that key provisions in SB202 lack any semblance of public support among Georgia voters. Notable findings and a breakdown of opinions by party ID and race/ethnicity are provided in Figure 1 on page 2 of this memo. 

Criminalizing Line Warming 

Nearly 8-in-10 Georgians oppose the SB202 plan to criminalize the distribution of food and water to people standing in line waiting to vote (19 percent support – 77 percent oppose). Two-thirds of self-identified Republican voters oppose this policy as do three in four White voters, and 8-in-10 Black voters. 

Transfer Election Authority to State Legislature 

Three quarters of Georgia voters oppose the SB202 plan to allow the state legislature to take election authority away from local elections officials, counties, and the Secretary of State (18 percent support – 76 percent oppose). This is another proposal that is met with cross-partisan opposition. 

Wrong-Precinct Disenfranchisement 

Seven-in-ten Georgia voters oppose the SB202 plan that would throw out the vote of any eligible voter who votes at the wrong precinct location, regardless of circumstances like being given incorrect information by an election official (26 percent support – 70 percent oppose). Nearly two-thirds of White voters and eight-in-ten Black voters oppose this policy. 2 

Restricting Early Voting and Absentee Voting 

Figure 1

The poll finds that Georgia voters broadly and strongly oppose measures restricting voting rights that are currently moving in the Georgia General Assembly.

Most Georgia voters also oppose the SB202 plan to restrict the right to vote early or by absentee ballot. Roughly 7-in-10 voters oppose shortening the early voting period (27 percent support – 71 percent oppose) and restricting Sunday voting (28 percent support – 69 percent oppose), which a previous version of SB202 would have done. About 6-in-10 oppose shortening the absentee ballot request period (38 percent support – 60 percent oppose) and restricting and limiting the use of voting drop-boxes (36 percent support – 59 percent oppose). Notably, half of Republican voters, 8-in-10 Democrats, and 7-in-10 independents are against shortening the early voting period and restricting Sunday voting.